How to Avoid Danger at a Railroad Crossing

There are many dangerous situations that can arise while driving, and we want you to know how to react to all of them, regardless of their frequency or infrequency. Coming upon a railroad cross can often be a confusing situation, so we would like to prepare you with some safety tips for this encounter.

Obey the signals. If a gate is closing or has already closed, stay clear and don’t try to punch the gas or maneuver around the blockade. If you are already underneath the arm as it begins to lower, cautiously proceed through the crossing. 

Always look both ways. It is better to be safe than sorry, and looking each way should be a common practice for you at any intersection. Even if there is no sight or signal of a train, be aware of your surroundings.

Stay clear if a train is coming. Be patient and don’t nudge up to the barrier as a train is passing through. Stay at least 15 feet back from the intersection to avoid potential complications with the barrier or debris.

Be sure it’s just one train. It can be quite efficient for trains to travel one behind another, so be sure that you don’t zoom through the intersection without ensuring that there is just one train passing through.

React quickly in a pickle. If your vehicle stalls or breaks down on or very near the railroad tracks, immediately get everyone out of your vehicle and away from the rails. Call law enforcement and they will assist you with your vehicle and contacting train conductors.

We hope that these tips help you make safe decisions when you encounter railroad tracks in the future. If you have further questions, don’t hesitate to contact us at Nalley Honda.

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3 Reasons to Embrace the Electric Vehicle

As auto manufacturers come under pressure to come up with more environmentally-friendly technologies, car buyers are increasingly faced with the same issues. Hardened petrol heads may turn their back on the green movement, but many everyday drivers feel that they should be making concessions, and have thus created a new level of interest in electric cars. To the uninitiated, electric cars may not seem very appealing, but there are more and more reasons why drivers should be considering this type of vehicle. Here are three reasons from Nalley Honda as to why you should embrace the electric vehicle.

You could save money on taxes

In an effort to encourage otherwise dubious drivers, federal, state and local governments often offer comparably significant tax credits and rebates to electric car drivers. As electric car ownership increases, governments hope to achieve reductions in the overall level of emissions, which, in many cases, they are targeted on. Failure to achieve these targets could result in sizeable fines, so it actually makes financial sense for them to pay you to buy an electric car. More importantly, these rebates and credits are often available in conjunction with one another, so you could get a rebate at federal level and then again at state level. These rebates are limited, but if you check out the U.S. Department of Energy Web site, you can see if they are still in place.

They can be fun to drive

Some drivers almost certainly have the image that electric cars are slow and cumbersome to drive. That may be true of a golf cart, but the fact is that electric vehicles can be great fun, and, what’s more, they can perform well too. Traditional gasoline vehicles are relatively inefficient. They rely on the transmission to provide the requisite acceleration. Electric vehicles, however, deliver torque to the wheels immediately. That can make them sprightly and swift off the mark. As manufacturers release new models, drivers are finding that electric vehicles can actually show you a good time.

They don’t need so much maintenance

Taking your car in for a service can be an inconvenient and expensive chore. Electric cars need less maintenance, because the engine, exhaust system, and other parts that fall apart on a gasoline car are not required. The replacement motor and batteries need far less attention, meaning that you can enjoy more time on the road, uninterrupted by services. They also have no oil that needs changing, so that’s another maintenance routine that you can dispense with.

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2013 Honda CR-Z

You would think it would be impossible, making a car that is properly sporting to enthusiasts while being efficient and environmentally friendly. Think again. Nalley Honda introduces you to the 2013 Honda CR-Z.

Honda saw it as a challenge to combine these opposite attributes, and at the same time creating a stylish coupe that is sure to be the envy of neighbors. The end result is the 2013 Honda CR-Z, and if that name sounds vaguely familiar, then yes, this sporty hatchback shares its roots with the legendary CR-X that helped create an entire generation of Honda performance and respective automotive enthusiasts. There is one, slightly surprising difference, however. The CR-Z is a hybrid.

You’ve heard it before- hybrids are supposed to be for efficient driving, not sporty pretenses in the least. Take those misconceptions and throw them in the trash. Not only does the CR-Z look like a modernized CR-X (a sporty and affordable pocket rocket,) it drives the same, hybrid or not.

Looking at the exterior of the 2013 CR-Z, the similarities to its inspiration are evident. Up front, there’s a racy honeycomb mesh grille that hints at the car’s sporting intentions while being framed by projector-beam headlamps. Step up to the CR-Z EX, and those headlamps become HID units lined with LED Daytime Running Lights. With a look like this, you wouldn’t know the CR-Z was a hybrid unless you were told.

The side profile is equally seductive, with a rakish roofline that looks more like a fastback than a hatchback, yet the full functionality of a traditional hatch is included, hiding an impressive 25.1 cubic feet of cargo room behind the seats. 16-inch alloy wheels are standard rolling stock, yet are lighter than last year, meaning increased performance and handling response when the going gets twisty.

From the back, the CR-Z is simply breathtaking. That sloping roofline and rear hatch finds the end of the line here, being nicely finished with LED brake lights and a revised rear diffuser for the 2013 model year. Overall, the 2013 CR-Z is distinctively Honda, while being unique enough to make sure it will never be mistaken for another sports car or hybrid.

Inside, that trend continues. Slide into either seat- there are only two- and feast your eyes on the technology that sits before you. From the driver’s helm, there’s an obvious indication that the car is meant to put you in the excitement, as all instruments and controls are heavily canted towards the driver- just as it should be.

To the left of the racing-inspired steering wheel, you’ll find one of the calling cards of the CR-Z- a unique three-mode drive system to tailor the car’s responses to economical driving, or full-on performance, if the mood strikes. If you need even more power, the S+ button found on the steering wheel will give a boost of power for up to 10 seconds if other criteria are met.

The instrumentation found directly in front is clear, helpful, and positively gorgeous when the space-age blue elements are fully lit. A large analog tachometer falls directly in front, housing a digital speedometer, while being flanked by various instruments of the battery and electric motor’s condition, as well as coaching devices designed to help get the most out of every gallon.

As far as technology goes, drivers won’t be left wanting. There’s an automatic climate control directly to the right of the steering wheel to make sure that occupants are comfortable, all while being more fuel efficient than traditional manual controls. For the road warriors, there’s an available navigation system to make sure you get there safely, and a choice of 6- or 7-speaker sound systems, with the 7-speaker system including a subwoofer and 360 watts of power.

Speaking of power, now it’s time to take a look at what powers this sporty eco-cruiser. Of course, it’s a hybrid, but one tuned for the perfect combination of fun and efficiency. The 1.5-liter four-cylinder gasoline engine is paired with the electric motor to produce 130 horsepower and 140 pound-feet of torque when paired with the standard 6-speed manual transmission. Yes, we said manual transmission. In a hybrid.

Enthusiasts take note- this is the first and only 6-speed manual transmission you’ll find in any hybrid. There’s also a CVT automatic transmission with paddle shifters available, at the penalty of peak torque falling to 127 pound-feet.

As far as efficiency goes, keep in mind this is neither an all-out sports car nor a hypermiling hybrid. With that compromise come EPA fuel ratings of 31 city/38 highway for the manual, and 36/39 for the CVT. That’s not going to rival a true economy hybrid, but then again, that’s phenomenal fuel economy for a sporty car. The added power and fuel economy over last year’s model comes thanks to an all-new Lithium-Ion battery, saving weight while providing more electrons to the electric motor.

All in all, the 2013 Honda CR-Z is an iconic representation of the classic sporty hatchback that a generation fell in love with nearly 30 years ago. While now a hybrid packed to the gills with technology, safety, and comfort, it’s still just as stylish, economical, and fun to drive as the old CR-X. And it’s still affordable too, with pricing starting at just $20,000.

Is this the future of driving fun? We sure think so, and the 2013 CR-Z is the perfect example of fun and efficiency combined.

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Fun Facts About Valentines’ Day

Impress that special someone this Valentines’ Day with these fun facts from Nalley Honda.

Q: When did Valentines’ Day begin?

A: The ancient Romans honored Juno, goddess of marriage and women, during the Feast of Lupercal on February 14.

Q: What is the origin of the expression “wear your heart on your sleeve”?

A: In the middle ages, young men and women drew names out of a bowl to determine who their mate would be, pin the name to their sleeve, and wear it for a week. Now, we have Internet dating sites.

Q: When was Valentines’ Day made an official holiday?

A: In 1537, King Henry VII made official what everyone already knew: Valentines’ Day would be celebrated on February 14.

Q: Who receives the most Valentines’ Day cards?

A: Thousands of Valentines are sent to Verona, Italy, and addressed to Juliet each year. Apparently, they didn’t hear about her marriage to Romeo.

Q: Which group of people receive the most amount of Valentines each year?

A: Teachers receive more Valentines annually than mothers, sisters, parents, wives, and girlfriends.

Q: How many Valentines are sent annually?

A: The 1 billion Valentines sent annually is surpassed only by Christmas in regards to mailed items.

Q: Why are red roses considered the flower of passionate love?

A: The Roman goddess of love, Venus, preferred red roses. 

Q: What is considered good luck on Valentines’ Day?

A: Being awoke with a kiss brings good luck. Ending the day with a kiss means good luck, if you know what I mean.

Q: How many roses are bought on Valentines’ Day?

A: 189 million roses are sold each February 14.

Q: What famous invention was patented on Valentines’ Day?

A: Call up that special someone and inform him or her that the telephone was patented on Valentines’ Day, 1876 by Alexander Graham Bell.

Q: What’s a good Valentine sign that you need to get a life?

A: If you buy a Valentine for your pet, you really need help. Three percent of pet owners fall into this category.

Q: Do women buy roses on Valentines’ Day?

A: Twenty-seven percent of roses sold on Valentines’ Day are sold to women, some of whom send them to themselves.

Q: What’s a love spoon?

A: In a G-rated question and answer session, a love spoon is a carved spoon given to loved ones in Wales on Valentines’ Day.

Q: What state produces the most roses?

A: California produces approximately 60% of American roses.

Q: Where do most Valentine roses come from?

A: The majority of Valentine roses come from South America.

Q: What’s up with that diapered, bow-toting, winged guy on boxes of candy?

A: That would be Cupid, the son of Venus, whose arrow causes one to fall in love with the first person he or she sees.

Q: Has Valentines’ Day ever been canceled?

A: No, but many Valentines were rejected by the post office in the late 1800s for obscenity.

Q: Is Valentines’ Day just for lovers?

A: No, the St. Valentines’ Day massacre occurred on February 14, 1929 in Chicago (Penicillin was discovered on the same day). Captain James Cook was killed by Hawaiian natives on February 14, 1779.

Q: Why is the heart the romantic symbol of love?

A: Throughout history the heart has symbolized the soul and has been considered one’s emotional center.

Q: Who sent the first Valentine?

A: Legend has it that the Duke of Orleans sent Valentines to his wife in 1415 while he was imprisoned.

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Eco-Friendly Vehicle Materials

Vehicles are getting greener, and it’s not just that they use less gas to cover each mile. The materials used in cars and trucks are becoming more eco-friendly. Interior panels and trim are being made from plant-based materials, materials that once went to landfill are being recycled, and the manufacturing processes themselves are being re-engineered.

We at Nalley Honda are proud that car makers want to be good citizens, but there’s more to it: Waste elimination is a great way to reduce costs, as is adopting renewable materials and cleaner processes.

There’s another factor at work too. Cars wear out and eventually have to be scrapped. Manufacturers now consider this at the design stage, ensuring that the vehicles they so painstakingly assemble can be disassembled and recycled 15 or 20 years later.

Along the way, some unexpected benefits are emerging. Let’s look at some examples.

Plant-based raw materials

Many of the eco-friendly materials are hidden from sight, like the soy-based foam used in seat cushions and head restraints, and the kenaf, a bamboo-like tropical plant that’s replacing oil-based resins inside doors. The headliners – the material on the inside of the roof – is going green too, with hemp and flax replacing fiberglass. Unexpected benefit – these new materials are often stronger and lighter than those they’re replacing, helping to improve gas mileage.

Like it or not, most car interiors are plastic, and this oil-based material has the unpleasant habit of emitting volatile organic compounds into the air, a process called “off-gassing.” But new, biodegradable plastics made from the sugars in plants like corn and sugarcane are emerging that don’t suffer this problem – and don’t require oil. No odors – that’s another benefit no one expected.

Recycling

One company has found a clever use for all the cardboard packaging that would otherwise be dumped: they’re turning it into a sound-absorbing material that goes between the headliner and the roof. And under our feet, another ingenious manufacturer is using recycled denim for under-carpet padding.

The reuse goes further: some of the wood trim pieces found in premium cars are now “engineered.” That is, they’re assembled from wood scraps that would otherwise have been thrown away, which reduces the need to fell fresh timber.

Plastics are being recycled too. Underbody panels are being made from recycled detergent bottles, tires, and battery casings, while interior fabrics are now woven from recycled plastic bottles. You could be sitting on your old pop bottles right now!

“Greening” the manufacturing processes

Leather might be a natural material, but the tanning process uses chromium, which is an environmental concern. So the companies that supply leather for vehicle interiors are re-engineering their processes to reduce, or even eliminate, their use of this metal.

An alternative to leather found in some luxury cars is Alcantara. This looks and feels like suede but is actually made from polyester fiber. The Alcantara company has been working to minimize its environmental impact for many years and has been officially carbon neutral, as measured by external bodies, since 2009.

Adopting alternatives

Car companies don’t like using hazardous materials, so they continue to seek out less harmful alternatives. One example is the elimination of lead from engine bearings, a second is the work underway to eliminate mercury from HID headlights.

Good for business, good for the environment

There’s no doubt our cars and trucks are becoming greener. Gas mileage is improving, but just as important, the manufacturers are switching to more eco-friendly materials. This isn’t just because they want to be good citizens; it’s good business too.

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Airbags Then and Now

Modern car manufacturers invest heavily in safety technology in order to reduce the likelihood of serious injury or deaths in their vehicles. The level of active and passive safety features on the average modern production car is very advanced compared to even ten years ago, let alone decades before. One of the most successful initiatives has been the airbag.

Patents for early airbags were first submitted in the 1950s. A German named Walter Linderer submitted an airbag patent back in 1951, which was based on a system of compressed air. Later research found that this could not deploy the bag quickly enough and was the design was abandoned. The first production car to feature an airbag was the Oldsmobile Toronado. Airbags were then offered in Oldsmobile’s and Buick’s in 1975 and 1976 respectively, and Cadillac soon followed suit. There were problems with these early designs, however, which tragically resulted in some fatalities.

Airbags once again started to appear in production cars in the mid-1980s, and by 1988 Chrysler offered air bags as standard equipment. TRW began production of the first gas-inflated airbag in 1994, and in 1998, front airbags became a federally required safety feature in production cars. Even the airbags of 1996 were not without risk, however, and airbag technology has advanced considerably since then.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), 53 people were killed in 1997 by an airbag, when it deployed during a collision. Of those 53 people, 31 were children. These first-generation airbags caused injury or death due to the extreme force with which the bag deployed. Passengers were at even greater risk if they were not restrained by a seat belt. These deaths triggered an investment in new technology, and a change in the law, which meant that “depowered” airbags became permissible. This type of airbag reduced the deployment force based on the occupant of the seat. This was particularly important where children were concerned, but children were still found to be at risk.

Airbag technology then progressed further to introduce advanced, dual-stage, and multi-stage airbags. These systems featured sensors, located in the seat and seatbelts, which provided information about the occupant’s weight and seating position. In the event of a collision, the car’s computer would then be able to reduce the power of or even stop the airbag’s deployment. Even these systems were not without problems, however, as the sensors could easily be too sensitive and cause the bag to be deactivated, for example, if the car swerved, even if that was just before a collision.

These systems have now been further enhanced, however, to create very sensitive, accurate airbag systems, which use sophisticated technologies to keep seat occupants safe. Advanced airbag systems were phased in from 2003 onwards, and since 2006, all light-duty vehicles are required to have these systems installed. The NHTSA requires that these systems pass rigorous tests to ensure the safety of passengers, and modern advanced airbag systems now protect and save many lives every year.

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2013 Honda CR-Z

You would think it would be impossible, making a car that is properly sporting to enthusiasts while being efficient and environmentally friendly. Think again.

Honda saw it as a challenge to combine these opposite attributes, and at the same time creating a stylish coupe that is sure to be the envy of neighbors. The end result is the 2013 Honda CR-Z, and if that name sounds vaguely familiar, then yes, this sporty hatchback shares its roots with the legendary CR-X that helped create an entire generation of Honda performance and respective automotive enthusiasts. There is one, slightly surprising difference, however. The CR-Z is a hybrid.

You’ve heard it before- hybrids are supposed to be for efficient driving, not sporty pretenses in the least. Take those misconceptions and throw them in the trash. Not only does the CR-Z look like a modernized CR-X (a sporty and affordable pocket rocket,) it drives the same, hybrid or not.

Looking at the exterior of the 2013 CR-Z, the similarities to its inspiration are evident. Up front, there’s a racy honeycomb mesh grille that hints at the car’s sporting intentions while being framed by projector-beam headlamps. Step up to the CR-Z EX, and those headlamps become HID units lined with LED Daytime Running Lights. With a look like this, you wouldn’t know the CR-Z was a hybrid unless you were told.

The side profile is equally seductive, with a rakish roofline that looks more like a fastback than a hatchback, yet the full functionality of a traditional hatch is included, hiding an impressive 25.1 cubic feet of cargo room behind the seats. 16-inch alloy wheels are standard rolling stock, yet are lighter than last year, meaning increased performance and handling response when the going gets twisty.

From the back, the CR-Z is simply breathtaking. That sloping roofline and rear hatch finds the end of the line here, being nicely finished with LED brake lights and a revised rear diffuser for the 2013 model year. Overall, the 2013 CR-Z is distinctively Honda, while being unique enough to make sure it will never be mistaken for another sports car or hybrid.

Inside, that trend continues. Slide into either seat- there are only two- and feast your eyes on the technology that sits before you. From the driver’s helm, there’s an obvious indication that the car is meant to put you in the excitement, as all instruments and controls are heavily canted towards the driver- just as it should be.

To the left of the racing-inspired steering wheel, you’ll find one of the calling cards of the CR-Z- a unique three-mode drive system to tailor the car’s responses to economical driving, or full-on performance, if the mood strikes. If you need even more power, the S+ button found on the steering wheel will give a boost of power for up to 10 seconds if other criteria are met.

The instrumentation found directly in front is clear, helpful, and positively gorgeous when the space-age blue elements are fully lit. A large analog tachometer falls directly in front, housing a digital speedometer, while being flanked by various instruments of the battery and electric motor’s condition, as well as coaching devices designed to help get the most out of every gallon.

As far as technology goes, drivers won’t be left wanting. There’s an automatic climate control directly to the right of the steering wheel to make sure that occupants are comfortable, all while being more fuel efficient than traditional manual controls. For the road warriors, there’s an available navigation system to make sure you get there safely, and a choice of 6- or 7-speaker sound systems, with the 7-speaker system including a subwoofer and 360 watts of power.

Speaking of power, now it’s time to take a look at what powers this sporty eco-cruiser. Of course, it’s a hybrid, but one tuned for the perfect combination of fun and efficiency. The 1.5-liter four-cylinder gasoline engine is paired with the electric motor to produce 130 horsepower and 140 pound-feet of torque when paired with the standard 6-speed manual transmission. Yes, we said manual transmission. In a hybrid.

Enthusiasts take note- this is the first and only 6-speed manual transmission you’ll find in any hybrid. There’s also a CVT automatic transmission with paddle shifters available, at the penalty of peak torque falling to 127 pound-feet.

As far as efficiency goes, keep in mind this is neither an all-out sports car nor a hypermiling hybrid. With that compromise come EPA fuel ratings of 31 city/38 highway for the manual, and 36/39 for the CVT. That’s not going to rival a true economy hybrid, but then again, that’s phenomenal fuel economy for a sporty car. The added power and fuel economy over last year’s model comes thanks to an all-new Lithium-Ion battery, saving weight while providing more electrons to the electric motor.

All in all, the 2013 Honda CR-Z is an iconic representation of the classic sporty hatchback that a generation fell in love with nearly 30 years ago. While now a hybrid packed to the gills with technology, safety, and comfort, it’s still just as stylish, economical, and fun to drive as the old CR-X. And it’s still affordable too, with pricing starting at just $20,000.

Is this the future of driving fun? We sure think so, and the 2013 CR-Z is the perfect example of fun and efficiency combined.

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Tips to Remember When Driving a Rental or Loaner Vehicle

Driving a rental or loaner vehicle can be a fun break from your usual vehicle, even if you have been forced to do it by factors outside your control. If you are driving a car of this sort, however, you should not assume that it is simply a case of taking the keys and cruising away. It’s very important to understand what your obligations and responsibilities are. Here are some tips to remember when driving a rental or loaner vehicle.

Fuel

It is vital that you check your liabilities for gas. In some cases you will be supplied a vehicle with a full tank of gas, and you must return it on that basis. In other cases, the tank will be close to empty, and you will simply have to put in the gas that you need to use. In the case of the former, make sure that you fill the tank up completely or you may be charged a nasty re-fueling fee. In the case of the latter, ensure that you do not put more fuel in the tank than you need or you may be funding the next user’s driving.
Damage report 

Make sure that you have checked the car over for damage BEFORE you drive it away. In most cases, you will be issued with a damage report. Check this carefully, and do not be frightened to be too picky. In many cases, you can be held liable for all damage to the vehicle and if it is not on the report when you take the car away, you will be unable to prove that you did not cause the damage.

Emergency cover

Your rental or loaner vehicle will normally be supplied with inclusive emergency breakdown coverage. Ensure that you have all the details to hand that you may need in the event that you need to call for assistance. Check this before you drive off, but if you forget, give the rental company a call from home to clarify the contact details and level of cover that you have. Make sure that you are aware of any additional responsibilities that you may have. You may be asked to give the rental company a call as well as the assistance number, for example.

Mileage limits

You cannot assume that you are able to drive the car for unlimited mileage while it is on loan to you. In some cases, you may be limited to a reasonable mileage limit, after which you will be charged a hefty fee on a mile-by-mile basis. If you are on a mileage-restricted contract, ensure that you confirm the car’s mileage before you leave and that you reset the counter to zero so that you can easily keep tabs on your usage.

Documentation

Keep all the documentation related to your rental or loan vehicle. Do not leave it in the glove box or on the seat in the car. If the car is stolen, you will not have any paperwork related to the car. Make sure that you do not blindly sign every piece of paper put in front of you either. Like any other type of contract, make sure you know what you are signing before you sign it.

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3 Technologies That Are Revolutionizing the Driving Experience

Auto manufacturers have always been at the forefront when it comes to new technology. In a very competitive market, being able to develop new gadgets and capabilities is critical when it comes to selling new cars. So while new car models feature the latest developments, engineers are already working on the ‘next big thing.’ So what will be the next big developments in technology to revolutionize the driving experience? Here are three ideas.

Cars that can communicate with each other

One of the biggest challenges in road safety comes from the independence that one vehicle has over another. Car drivers are almost entirely insulated from each other and the outside world until disaster strikes. One technology that is trying to address this problem is called Vehicle-to-Vehicle communication – or V2V. V2V technology is now being used by manufacturers as potential technology for future cars.

V2V sends wireless signals about a car’s location, speed, and direction. These signals are, in turn, received by other cars, which interpret this information and make appropriate conclusions. That may be simply to warn the driver, or it could mean applying the brakes. A logical progression from V2V is V2I – Vehicle-to-Infrastructure. This would allow cars to talk to traffic signals and other technology to help further control traffic and speeds.

Airbags that prevent collisions 

The airbag is almost certainly one of the greatest car safety gadgets and has saved countless lives since the technology was first developed. Airbags are a great example of a passive safety feature, which means that they reduce the risk of death or injury in the event of an accident. The technology could be used, however, as an active safety feature, which could actually help prevent accidents.

Manufacturers are now experimenting with air bags, which would deploy beneath a vehicle in the event that a potential collision was about to occur. A special coating would help slow the car down, helping the driver to stop much more quickly. By lifting the car up, these bags would also reduce the risk of injury from passengers slipping under seat belts and would lessen any potential damage or injury from bumper-to-bumper impact.

Cars that can drive themselves

The ultimate new technology must surely be one that removes the need for a car to have a driver. Any kind of independent driving technology would, of course, ensure that rules were always adhered to and would remove the margin for human error that almost certainly costs many lives every year. The technology giant Google has invested heavily in the self-driving car to date, although the big manufacturers are also likely to adopt this technology. Who knows whether it will be possible to purchase a self-driving production car within ten years?

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Georgia’s Child Safety Laws on the Road

Laws over car safety continue to evolve, as governments and local authorities work harder to try and minimize death and injury on the road. While laws around adults using seat belts are now very well established, laws concerning the restraint of children in cars are continuing to develop and become stricter. If you live and/or drive in the State of Georgia, remember that when it comes to child seat safety, you cannot ignore the law. Here’s what you need to know about child safety laws on the road in Georgia.

What the law says

The current child passenger safety laws in Georgia became effective in July 2011 and enforce strict regulations for parents regarding how their children should be carried in a car. The law states that all children under the age of 8 must be properly restrained in an appropriate child passenger safety seat or booster seat. All drivers must comply with the regulations when driving a car, pickup, or sports utility vehicle with children. Only taxi cabs and public transit vehicles are exempt from the regulations.

All drivers on roads in Georgia are covered by the law, regardless of which state the driver or vehicle is registered in.

Under Georgian law, an appropriate child restraint system is one that is appropriate for the child’s height and weight and is used according to manufacturer instructions.

Penalties

Any driver that is found to have broken this law is liable for a fine of up to $50 and one license point for a first offense. For a second conviction, the fine can increase up to $100 and 2 license points. These penalties apply for each child that is improperly restrained.

Defenses and exceptions

Children over the height of four feet, nine inches may be restrained by the car’s built-in safety belt, provided that it fits and restrains the child appropriately. Other children should also be restrained by lap and shoulder belts. A lap belt may be used where a child weighs more than 40 pounds if the vehicle is not equipped with both lap and shoulder belts.

Buses and multi-function school activity buses are exempt from the law. This is because these vehicles must adhere to stricter safety standards already, including providing high-back padded seats and enhanced rollover protection.

If a parent or guardian is able to produce a written physician’s statement that confirms that the child has a physical or mental condition that makes the restraint system unsuitable, he or she is exempt.

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